Super blood moon dazzles West Australian as they gathered to take photos of the rare phenomenon | Ralph Lauren

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West Aussies were treated to one of the best views of the super blood moon last night, with many gathering as Kings Park to get a snap a photo of the rare phenomenon.

It occurs when a total lunar eclipse — or blood moon — coincides with a full moon.

Perth Observatory’s Matt Woods said the red-orange hue of a blood moon was caused by gases in Earth’s atmosphere.

The super blood moon rises over Point Walter.
Camera IconThe super blood moon rises over Point Walter. Credit: Balbir Singh

“Unlike a total solar eclipse, there is still some light going through the atmosphere and hitting the moon,” he said.

“The nitrogen and oxygen absorbs the blue light from the sun, which means what’s left over is red and yellow light, which makes for an orange moon.”

A rare super blood moon can be seen in the sky above Wollongong, NSW, Wednesday, May 26, 2021.
Camera IconA rare super blood moon can be seen in the sky above Wollongong, NSW, Wednesday, May 26, 2021. Credit: DEAN LEWINS/AAPIMAGE

In Australia’s centre, the total eclipse occurred between 8:41 and 8:55pm, while in Western Australia the moon appeared fully red from 7:11 to 7:25pm.

Dozens of people in Perth were spotted taking photos of the super blood moon at one of the city’s best lookouts in Kings Park last night.

Dozens of people in Perth were spotted taking photos of the super blood moon at one of the city's best lookouts in Kings Park last night.
Camera IconDozens of people in Perth were spotted taking photos of the super blood moon at one of the city’s best lookouts in Kings Park last night. Credit: 7NEWS

While others took advantage of other prime locations including Mardalup Park in Claisebrook Cove, Matilda Bay near the University of WA and South Ledge Lookout at Mundaring Weir.

Star gazers across the globe also caught the spectacular event on camera, sharing their incredible photos and videos on social media.

Australian National University astrophysicist Brad Tucker said the phenomenon only happened every five years or so.

“It doesn’t happen that often to get this combination … so it’s definitely a special sight,” he said.

Dr Tucker said Australians had the privilege of one of the best and most convenient viewing times

“The rarest bit of this moon is that it happened in the early evening and not in the middle of the night,”

“You don’t need special equipment … you just need your eyes, because you can see the beautiful colours and details of the moon.”

Stargazers were able to catch the sight on the east coast from 7:44pm with the total eclipse – when it’s fully red – occurring between 9:11 and 9:25pm.

With AAP.



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